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May 5-7, 2017
About Kinetic Sculpture Parades
Teams build human powered vehicles that must complete a course that goes over land and various other obstacles (both intended and otherwise). Teams are scored on how fast they complete the course, how well/interesting their craft is put together, the “funness” of their theme/costumes, and numerous other qualities as judged by various individuals who have been deemed experts in their kinetics related field of study.

Baltimore, MD
​ www.kineticbaltimore.com

The Baltimore Kinetic Sculpture Race (also known as the East Coast Championship) began in 1999 when Rebecca Hoffberger, founder of the American Visionary Art Museum, heard about the World Championship on television. She wanted to bring the race to Baltimore, and worked with Hobart to do it. Since the beginning, Theresa Segreti has led AVAM’s sponsorship of the race. For the first year, there were just six entries. AVAM built the Cha Cha Bird, the most impressive sculpture that year that served as inspiration to others.  Two years later in 2001, the Chicken was rebuilt as Fifi the giant pink poodle—and has been the race’s mascot every year since.​

Eureka, CA
The Kinetic Grand Championship is a 3-day, 42-mile bicycle race over land, sand, mud and water. Many refer to the Kinetic Grand Championship as the “Triathlon of the Art World.”

Day 1 of the Kinetic Grand Championship starts on the Plaza in Arcata, California at the noon whistle every Memorial Day weekend. The racers take off to the Manila dunes, where they race through miles of sand to the great and inevitable “Deadman’s Drop.” Then on to Eureka’s downtown gazebo.

Day 2 starts in Eureka at the waterfront on the Humboldt Bay, where brave Kinetic Pilots race their crafts through the water (most float). Then back on land where kinetic sculptures go up Hookton Hill, a 1 mile-7% incline and decline. Day 2 ends with a private campout for racers and volunteers only.

Day 3 starts from the mouth of the Eel River, through Morgan slough and onto dry land. Racers cross the finish line on Ferndale’s historic Mainstreet, where racers park and head up to the Final Awards Dinner at Ferndale’s Fireman’s Hall.

Corvallis, OR
This is no ordinary race. Graand Kinetic Challenge teams are out to prove that their sculpture is the best--best in art, best in engineering, best in speed, best in pageantry, and best all around!  Check here for 2013 Awards!

Their biggest test is the race itself and what a course it is! Racers must ride over 10 miles of city streets, over a man-made sand dune, across 3000 feet of sun-dried, clay pasture, through 200 feet of deep, thick, sticky mud, and down 2 miles of the Willamette River. All of this under pedal power with no help from their friends (or spectators)!

Denver, CO
​Teams build human powered vehicles that must complete a course that goes over land, water, and various other obstacles (both intended and otherwise). Teams are scored on how fast they complete the course, how well/interesting their craft is put together, the “funness” of their theme/costumes, and numerous other qualities as judged by various individuals who have been deemed experts in their kinetics related field of study.